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Featured Exhibits

Coronelli's Atlas of 1693 - Exhibit 1 of 2
Coronelli's Atlas of 1693 - Exhibit 1 of 2

"Vincenzo Maria Coronelli (August 16, 1650 – December 9, 1718) was an Italian Franciscan friar, cosmographer, cartographer, publisher, and encyclopedist known in particular for his atlases and globes. He spent most of his life in Venice. Vincenzo Coronelli was born, probably in Venice, on August 16, 1650, the fifth child of a Venetian tailor named Maffio Coronelli. At ten, young Vincenzo was sent to the city of Ravenna and was apprenticed to a xylographer. In 1663 he was accepted into the Conventual Franciscans, becoming a novice in 1665. At age sixteen he published the first of his one hundred forty separate works. In 1671 he entered the Convent of Saint Maria Gloriosa dei Frari in Venice, and in 1672 Coronelli was sent by the order to the College of Saint Bonaventura and Saints Apostoli in Rome where he earned his doctor’s degree in theology in 1674. He excelled in the study of both astronomy and Euclid. A little before 1678, Coronelli began working as a geographer and was commissioned to make a set of terrestrial and celestial globes for Ranuccio II Farnese, Duke of Parma. Each finely crafted globe was five feet in diameter (c. 175 cm) and so impressed the Duke that he made Coronelli his theologian. Coronelli's renown as a theologian grew and in 1699 he was appointed Father General of the Franciscan order." Wikipedia

Coronelli Globes at the Bibliotheque Nationale, Francois Mitterand Library

Article on Coronelli from Academia.edu

Coronelli's Atlas of 1693 - Exhibit 2 of 2
Coronelli's Atlas of 1693 - Exhibit 2 of 2

"Vincenzo Maria Coronelli (August 16, 1650 – December 9, 1718) was an Italian Franciscan friar, cosmographer, cartographer, publisher, and encyclopedist known in particular for his atlases and globes. He spent most of his life in Venice. Vincenzo Coronelli was born, probably in Venice, on August 16, 1650, the fifth child of a Venetian tailor named Maffio Coronelli. At ten, young Vincenzo was sent to the city of Ravenna and was apprenticed to a xylographer. In 1663 he was accepted into the Conventual Franciscans, becoming a novice in 1665. At age sixteen he published the first of his one hundred forty separate works. In 1671 he entered the Convent of Saint Maria Gloriosa dei Frari in Venice, and in 1672 Coronelli was sent by the order to the College of Saint Bonaventura and Saints Apostoli in Rome where he earned his doctor’s degree in theology in 1674. He excelled in the study of both astronomy and Euclid. A little before 1678, Coronelli began working as a geographer and was commissioned to make a set of terrestrial and celestial globes for Ranuccio II Farnese, Duke of Parma. Each finely crafted globe was five feet in diameter (c. 175 cm) and so impressed the Duke that he made Coronelli his theologian. Coronelli's renown as a theologian grew and in 1699 he was appointed Father General of the Franciscan order."Wikipedia

Coronelli Globes at the Bibliotheque Nationale, Francois Mitterand Library

Article on Coronelli from Academia.edu

Jo Mora's Carte of Los Angeles
Jo Mora's Carte of Los Angeles

Here by author and researcher Nancy W. Grossman shares with Digital Gallery viewers her introduction to Jo Mora as found in her book Jo Mora's Carte of Los Angeles: A Trail Guide published in December 2019.

Further in the digital exhibit, the dots found on the map correspond to a few of the sections in her book each of which articulates the significance of those vignettes found on Jo Mora's carte...

"Joseph Jacinto “Jo” Mora. How does one begin to summarize such an enormous life?

Jo Mora, Renaissance Man of the West, is the phrase I come upon most, that and Jo Mora, cowboy cartographer. This man is also a writer, a painter, illustrator and muralist, sculptor and photographer, and a cartoonist and comic artist, which will come as no surprise to fans of his cartes. He even designs a 1925 half dollar coin for the US Mint commemorating the state of California’s 75th anniversary.

During an insurgency in 1877, the Mora family flees Uruguay. Jo is a year old at the time; his brother Luis is three. They go first to Barcelona, finally arriving in the US in 1880, where they settle in the greater New York area. Both boys are already deep into the making of art; at the ages of eight and ten respectively, they consider creating a twenty- foot mural of the Iroquois Indian wars, though there’s no record of them actually doing so.

Their father Domingo is an accomplished sculptor. Jo and Luis attend primary school in Perth Amboy and grammar school in Allston, Massachusetts. At 15, Jo completes the Boston Latin School, and graduates from the Pingry Academy in Elizabeth, New Jersey in 1894. Both study sculpture under their father, who teaches art in Perth Amboy, Boston and New York City.

By 1895 Jo’s studying at the Art Students League, the Chase School of Art in New York and the Cowles Art School in Boston – and, at 19, has already produced poster murals for the Clermont Skating Rink in Brooklyn. Returning to Boston, Jo goes to work first for the Boston Traveler and then becomes a member of the Boston Herald art staff for the next four years, illustrating articles plus various books.

In 1903, he takes a trip west, working as a cowpuncher on a ranch in Solvang near the Mission Santa Ines, which inspires him to travel the entire Camino Real and sketch the Missions he saw. In 1904 he travels by mule-drawn wagon across Yosemite, Kings Canyon, Sequoia National Park and the Mojave Desert to Needles on his way to the Hopi mesas in Arizona. In Arizona, he is permitted to witness the Hopi Snake Dance, then sets to both photographing and producing detailed artwork of the ceremonies of the Hopi and Navaho tribes he’s gotten to know over two years of living among them.

Upon settling back in California he will marry Grace Needham, of San Jose, CA., at the Mission San Gabriel in 1907 and start to raise his soon to be born children Jo, Jr. and patty.

Mora publishes twelve of his iconic cartes over his lifetime. The first, Monterey Peninsula, his second, The 17 Mile Drive, and the first version of California all come out in 1927. San Diego appears in 1928. The three national parks, Yosemite, Yellowstone and Grand Canyon, all come out in 1931. Grace Line Fleet to the Old Spanish Main and Evolution of the Cowboy: Levi’s Round-Up of Cowboy Lore are published in 1933; the latter is a poster rather than a map, as is his Indians of North America in 1936. Carmel-by- the-Sea and Los Angeles are both issued in 1942. A second, smaller version of California will be his last, in 1945. An unfinished pencil rendering of a map of Catalina is found after his death.

But cartes are hardly all Jo Mora does. This man’s work is as varied as it is prolific. Starting out collaborating with his father, he finds himself working on huge architectural projects. In Los Angeles, at least four buildings include his work, including the Palace Theatre; he is assisting his father on four sculpted allegorical panels representing song, dance, music and drama when his father dies while this commission is still in progress. Mora completes it.

In San Jose, Mora creates two heroic male sphinx figures for the Scottish Rite Temple [today the San Jose Athletic Club], plus bas-reliefs over its entrance and throughout the building. He provides decorative elements for the Monterey County Courthouse, as well as numerous detailed panels for the King City High School auditorium. In Carmel, he sculpts Father Junipero Serra’s cenotaph, an altar and a cross.

He creates pediments and bas-relief panels for four buildings in San Francisco; his Miguel de Cervantes looks down on his Don Quixote and Sancho Panza in the Golden Gate Park. A marble bench with sculpted bears by Mora sits in front of the Sather Tower on the UC Berkeley campus. He creates the main entrance doorway and sculptures of bears to support fountains for the Union Wool Building in Boston. He designs a number of homes himself.

Architectural work is just one facet of Mora’s endless creativity. He designs everything from ordinary scale sculptures, many of cowboys breaking broncs, to “heroic” (larger than life) sculptures, to bronze plaques and vast murals. He creates fifteen or more dioramas, thirteen for the Will Rogers Memorial in Claremore, Oklahoma.

One diorama, exhibited at the California State Building at the 1939 Golden Gate International Exposition, is a one-hundred-foot-long depiction of the 1769 Portolá Expedition. Tragically, it is destroyed in a fire six months after the opening of the fair.

Mora illustrates countless books, both his own and for those of others. He designs bookends, trophies, coins and scrip certificates for use in Carmel during the Depression. He sculpts his son Jo Jr. at three years of age, reata in hand, breaking a hobby horse."

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